Research Findings

The list below displays the most recently updated research at the top of the list.

US leading in biofuels and neutron scattering from 2003 to 2006

Submitted by Brown.Marilyn on

Interviews with leading researchers and the analysis of publication data in the fields of biofuels and neutron scattering have revealed that the United States was leading the way in both these fields of research from 2003 to 2006. The analysis has also shown that 36% of the biofuels publications from those years were collaborative, of which about a third (13% of the total) were international collaborations. The analysis of neutron scattering showed that 69% of all publications from the same years were collaborative, of which two thirds (43% of the total publications) were international collaborations.

Marilyn Brown profile

SciSIP Award # 0738184 with Susan Cozzens


Impact of foreign graduate students

Submitted by Mobarak.Ahmed on

Foreign graduate students enrolled at US research universities have a significant impact on publications at the departmental level. While US and foreign graduate students offer similar productivity profiles, foreign graduate students generate a relatively higher increase in citations. On average, a one-percent increase in enrollments of American students increases scientific publications by around 0.4 publications while a one-percent increase in foreign enrollment raises scientific publications by around 0.5 publications. (Citation: http://www.aaas.org/spp/SciSIP/ppts/SciSIP.3.2009_Stuen.Mobarak.Maskus.pdf)

Ahmed Mobarak profile

SciSIP Award # 0738036 with Keith Maskus



Inbred faculty produce less peer reviewed material

Submitted by Veloso.Francisco on

Ph.D.s employed by the universities at which they received their degree are detrimental to scientific productivity. “Inbred” faculty produce 15% less peer reviewed material then their non-inbred counterparts. (Citation: http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/user/fveloso/navelgazing.pdf)

Francisco Veloso profile

SciSIP Award # 0738182


Follow-on contributors in the public sector

Submitted by Murray.Fiona on

Vast and diverse ownership is an important aspect of a healthy economy, but creates significant problems for follow-on contributors in the public sector. Patent thickets can be to expensive or difficult to navigate for follow-on contributors.  (Citation: http://fmurray.scripts.mit.edu/docs/Huang.Murray_AMJ_09.16.2008_FINAL.pdf

Fiona Murray profile

SciSIP Award # 0738394 with Jeffrey Furman and Scott Stern


Follow-on research of disease genes is negatively impacted by patent law

Submitted by Murray.Fiona on

Follow-on research of disease genes is negatively impacted by patent law.   Cancer related genes suffer a negative impact on forward citations of 11% compared with 4% in the non-cancer sample. Disease genes are highly guarded because of their earnings potential. (Citation: http://fmurray.scripts.mit.edu/docs/Huang.Murray_AMJ_09.16.2008_FINAL.pdf

Fiona Murray profile

SciSIP Award # 0738394 with Jeffrey Furman and Scott Stern


Private sector has been particularly aggressive with intellectual property law enforcement

Submitted by Murray.Fiona on

There is significant evidence that the private sector has been particularly aggressive with intellectual property law enforcement targeted at other firms and public institutions. Medical –center citations rates have declined substantially in recent years. (Citation: http://fmurray.scripts.mit.edu/docs/Huang.Murray_AMJ_09.16.2008_FINAL.pdf

Fiona Murray profile

SciSIP Award # 0738394 with Jeffrey Furman and Scott Stern


Private sector patents have more of a negative impact on forward citations

Submitted by Murray.Fiona on

Private sector patents have more of a negative impact on forward citations, a decline of 6% to 9% compared to 0% to 3% for academic papers. Strict patent enforcement can lead to a blockage of follow-up research. (Citation: http://fmurray.scripts.mit.edu/docs/Huang.Murray_AMJ_09.16.2008_FINAL.pdf

Fiona Murray profile

SciSIP Award # 0738394 with Jeffrey Furman and Scott Stern


A patent-pair contributes to both the academic and industrial world

Submitted by Murray.Fiona on

Among the 4,270 patents on human genes, at least 35% are associated with gene patent-paper pairs. A patent-pair contributes to both the academic and industrial world because gene patent-paper pairs are utilized by the public and private sector to disclose findings. (Citation: http://fmurray.scripts.mit.edu/docs/Huang.Murray_AMJ_09.16.2008_FINAL.pdf

Fiona Murray profile

SciSIP Award # 0738394 with Jeffrey Furman and Scott Stern


Citation rates suffer a 24% decline the year of a patent grant

Submitted by Murray.Fiona on

Citation rates suffer a 24% decline the year of a patent grant. This negative acquiescence rate declines as year pass, while the adaptation rate rises as institutions and academics find ways to work around intellectual property laws. Over a period of years the citation rate returns back to normal as adaptation cancels out acquiescence. (Citation: http://www2.druid.dk/conferences/working_papers/20948f9816e83ffd917e0f93fd50.pdf)

Fiona Murray profile

SciSIP Award # 0738394 with Jeffrey Furman and Scott Stern


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