listserv messages

Replied by James Gover on 04/05/2017 - 09:33
I am unlikely to read a book on this topic, but I am very interested in the role of religion in the economic growth of Northern Utah (Mormons) and Israel (Jews). (On a larger scale, the role religion played in the difference in economic growth in North and South America or Northern and Southern Europe.) My Mormon friends tell me that their church places high value on members starting companies.  It may have nothing to do with the motivation of the church, but I believe most Mormons tithe 10% of their income; therefore, the Church benefits from the business success of its members. ... [Read more]  
Replied by Susan Fitzpatrick on 04/05/2017 - 10:56
Quick answers below as this topic is quite in my wheelhouse… Susan M. Fitzpatrick, Ph.D.President, James S. McDonnell Foundation Visit JSMF forum on academic issues: www.jsmf.org/clothing-the-emperor SMF blog  www.scientificphilanthropy.com       [Read more]  
Replied by James Gover on 04/05/2017 - 11:19
Susan,Thank you very much.jimOn Wed, Apr 5, 2017 at 1:56 PM, Susan Fitzpatrick <susan@jsmf.org> wrote:Quick answers below as this topic is quite in my wheelhouse… Susan M. Fitzpatrick, Ph.D.President, James S. McDonnell Foundation Visit JSMF forum on academic issues: www.jsmf.org/clothing-the-emperor SMF blog  www.scientificphilanthropy.com       [Read more]  
Replied by Kevin Boyak on 04/05/2017 - 19:45
Hi Jim, As a lifelong practicing Mormon (and as a fellow former Sandian now working for a small company), I can comment on the first part – thus adding to what your Mormon friends have told you. It is true that most practicing members of the LDS church do tithe at 10%. Tithing proceeds benefit not only the church and church members (in the form of church buildings, temples, etc.), but also the world at large (health and nutrition education and assistance in developing nations, disaster relief, etc.)  However, I don’t think that drives the motivation of the church. Rather, the LDS... [Read more]  
Replied by Brendan Godfrey on 04/05/2017 - 13:08
Jim,                I believe that JDRF and similar public charities are 501(c}3 organizations and must comply with provisions of that legislation, including filing Form 990 with the IRS annually.  This form contains much useful information, including what fraction of donated funds go for administration, and typically is available on the charity’s web site.  In addition, organizations exist that rate charities, GuideStar being perhaps the best known.  The state of incorporation of the charity also exercises some oversight.  I would be surprised if federal regulations specify IP... [Read more]  
Replied by James Gover on 04/05/2017 - 12:10
"the LDS church places extremely high value on education, self-reliance and on putting one’s self in a position to help others. That positioning can take many forms to include charitable giving, public service and employing others. Members starting companies is thus, in my view, a result of these values and motivators rather than something that is considered of high value in and of itself."I BELIEVE THAT YOU ARE CORRECT.  IT IS CLEAR THAT MORMONS HAVE CONTRIBUTED FAR MORE TO ECONOMIC GROWTH THAN THEIR NUMBERS WOULD SUGGEST.  IN ADDITION TO VALUES, THEIR SYSTEM OF SENDING YOUNG... [Read more]  
Replied by Godin, Benoît on 04/05/2017 - 14:15
Religion is at the heart of one of our main concepts of science and technology policy: innovation. This is a fascinating story (see http://www.csiic.ca/en/the-idea-of-innovation/). Over time, i.e. from the 1960s onward, innovation led to the marginalization of research in public discourses (see http://www.csiic.ca/en/research/). Benoit GodinProfesseurINRS (Montréal)Courriel: benoit.godin@ucs.inrs.caSite web:... [Read more]  
Replied by Gordon Reikard on 04/05/2017 - 18:23
There has been comparatively little investigation of the possible role of religion in economic performance, and the evidence appears to be ambiguous.   Anyone interested in this topic may wish to read the following 2003 paper by Robert Barro: http://scholar.harvard.edu/files/barro/files/religion_and_economic_growth_2003.pdf   [Read more]  
Replied by James Gover on 04/05/2017 - 13:31
Also, thanks for your paper, Mapping Altruism.  Enjoy the attachment.BTW, I have lots of high level materials on economic development in Provo, but am lacking details.  For example, how many gazellels in Provo came from profs or students leaving BYU.  (I am aware of one that was reported in a report I previously referenced.)  What  has BYU done to promote entrepreneurship in Provo?  Were particular departments at BYU more involved than others?  What specifically did they do?  What role have economic development officials played, if any? Do you have a contact in Provo that I could call... [Read more]  
Jim – thanks for the attachment, and thanks to the others providing materials linking religion and economic growth – fascinating stuff.Regarding BYU and contacts, I’ll take that offline and send you a couple of suggestions. Kevin From: James Gover [mailto:jgover@kettering.edu] Sent: Thursday, April 6, 2017 1:31 AMTo: Kevin Boyack <kboyack@mapofscience.com>Cc: SCISIP@listserv.nsf.govSubject: Re: [... [Read more]  
Replied by Brooke Struck on 04/06/2017 - 09:20
For another really good read on this subject, Ernst Cassirer’s Individual and the Cosmos in Renaissance Philosophy provides an accessible, compelling account of how the co-evolution of science and religion in the Renaissance produced the groundwork for our contemporary notion of objectivity.  http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/I/bo8779953.html   Best,   Brooke       Brooke Struck, Ph.D. Policy Analyst | Analyste des... [Read more]  

Posted by John Alic on 04/04/2017 - 05:07
Since the original query here had to do with politics, I’d add, what, I suppose a sidebar to Susan’s and Dan’s comments. First, the original designation of the AEC now DOE laboratories as “national” was a deliberate labeling effort intended, successfully, to distinguish them from the hundreds of other fed’l laboratories, such as those of USDA. These in particular at least some of the physicists who predominated in the AEC facilities looked down upon with considerable scorn. (Luis Alvarez:  “At Berkeley before the war, when we thought of gov’t research, we thought about the nearby Dept... [Read more]  

Posted by Holbrook, James on 04/04/2017 - 03:12
Interesting comments, Dan.If I were to go looking for anything related to your point #6, I'd begin with trying to find research on the translational science initiative.BrittJ. Britt HolbrookAssistant ProfessorDepartment of HumanitiesNew Jersey Institute of TechnologyTwitter: @jbrittholbrookBlog: jbrittholbrook.comImpactStory On Tue, Apr 4, 2017 at 2:00 AM, Daniel Sarewitz <Daniel.Sarewitz@... [Read more]  

Posted by Daniel Sarewitz on 04/04/2017 - 02:00
This is a great question, Susan.  Especially given that NIH gets 50% of all non-defense public research funding—to go along with the recent recognition that significant bodies of biomedical research are of poor quality, that there has been serious over-production of PhD’s in biomedical fields in recent years, and that the products of biomedical innovation system are often insanely expensive, even as in some key areas innovation has slowed considerably, in others promised progress has failed to occur (or been disappointingly modest), and meanwhile the nation’s public... [Read more]  

Posted by Weinberg, Bruce on 04/03/2017 - 20:04
Here are 2 items that I hope will be of interest:   1.       This article with David Blau at Ohio State (http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2017/03/21/1611748114.abstract) shows that the scientific workforce is aging relative to the population and that the majority of the aging of the STEM workforce is due to aging of the baby boomers. At the same time the lifting of mandatory retirement also played a role. More strikingly, we show that the STEM workforce will age 2.3 years... [Read more]  

Posted by Holly Falk-Krzesinski on 04/03/2017 - 13:49
Act Now for Best Rates in Clearwater, FL! Thanks to all those who submitted to the conference. The program committee is hard at work on the reviews and will be sending out decisions in mid-April.   In the meantime, check out our preliminaryConference Agenda to see the initial plans for the conference.    Reserve your room now at the 2017 SciTS Conference venue, the Hyatt Regency... [Read more]  

Posted by Susan Fitzpatrick on 04/03/2017 - 07:51
Fascinating.   Discussions of National Labs and their role in educational and economic development is energetic, rich, skeptical, and wide-ranging.   Discussion of the role funding for biomedical research in terms of its role and achievements… not so much.   Why?   Is it because when it comes to our health we become all too human and less academic?    Just curious… Susan M. Fitzpatrick, Ph.D.President, James S. McDonnell Foundation Visit JSMF forum on academic issues: www.jsmf.org/clothing-the-emperor SMF blog ... [Read more]  

Posted by Jeffrey Alexander on 04/01/2017 - 12:45
Congrats to SciSIP-supported researcher Pierre Azoulay, with lead author Danielle Li and co-author Bhaven Sampat, for the timely publication of their article with the above title as an early release article on the Science magazine website.http://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2017/03/29/science.aal0010.fullThe study has already picked up national news coverage:As Trump proposes cutting the NIH budget, a new study highlights its value... [Read more]  
Replied by Dan Stokols on 04/01/2017 - 10:59
Thanks Jeff for sharing the links to these articles!    DanOn Apr 1, 2017, at 1:45 PM, Jeffrey Alexander <jeffalex@stanfordalumni.org> wrote:Congrats to SciSIP-supported researcher Pierre Azoulay, with lead author Danielle Li and co-author Bhaven Sampat, for the timely publication of their article with the above title as an early release article on the Science magazine website.http://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2017/03/29/science.aal0010... [Read more]  

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