listserv messages

Replied by Creso Sa on 04/25/2017 - 14:24
Brooke: this is a helpful summary. For those who are interested in the Naylor report, here’s my take on its release and main recommendations.  https://www.timeshighereducation.com/opinion/litmus-test-science-funding-0   Best,   Creso Sá     From: Science of Science Policy Listserv <SCISIP@LISTSERV.NSF.GOV> on behalf of Brooke Struck <... [Read more]  

Posted by Stephen Fiore on 04/20/2017 - 20:37
Hi Everyone - see below about early bird registration deadline.  Don't forget to check out the great set of workshops we've arranged to benefit our various SciTS stakeholders (http://www.scienceofteamscience.org/2017-conference-workshops) as well as the eclectic group of featured speakers we've lined up (http://www.... [Read more]  

Posted by Lin, Jessica (FELLOW) on 04/19/2017 - 23:25
Colleagues, I am writing to share a publishing opportunity with you. I am editing a hardcover collection on clean energy finance (by selected invitation only) and interested individuals are encouraged to submit one or more original research or review chapter(s) for the upcoming work which will be published by Nova Science Publishers (https://www.novapublishers.com) upon submission in September. The work is tentatively titled, "Clean Energy Finance: Blended Options for a Brighter Future". The deadline for abstract... [Read more]  

Posted by Loet Leydesdorff on 04/19/2017 - 10:50
Inga A. Ivanova, Øivind Strand, and Loet Leydesdorff (2017; early view).  What is the effect of synergy in international collaboration on regional economies? Journal of the Knowledge Economy. doi: 10.1007/s13132-017-0480-2 ; https://arxiv.org/abs/1605.06013 In the present paper, we analyze the effect of international collaboration on regional markets. We compare two Norwegian counties with very different profiles in terms of how international or regional cooperation affects the synergy generated among the geographical, technological, and... [Read more]  

Posted by N. Peter Whitehead on 04/18/2017 - 03:00
Good morning SciSIP:I may be late to the parade, but I just discovered Steve Balmers pet project to track all public spending and present the data in usable form.  It may (I have not yet tried myself) be relevant to discussions on government spending on science.  Link here:http://usafacts.org/Best, N. Peter Whitehead, PhD, ME2npw2w@virginia.edunpwhitehead@mac.com [Read more]  
Replied by David Wojick on 04/18/2017 - 12:24
Under spending is says no data available yet, at least on my iPad.I just found a big black box -- research to support climate change adaptation. This is local and regional in nature, past climate and future projections. There is a lot going on, especially in DOD, but OMB says it is not reported separately so there is no way to know how much. Could be a big policy issue.DavidInside Public Access [Read more]  
Replied by Susan Fitzpatrick on 04/18/2017 - 11:35
Fascinating.   One quick look – family expenditures – health is the highest, by quite a bit.    Susan M. Fitzpatrick, Ph.D.President, James S. McDonnell Foundation Visit JSMF forum on academic issues: www.jsmf.org/clothing-the-emperor SMF blog  www.scientificphilanthropy.com       [Read more]  
Replied by C. Scott Dempwolf on 04/24/2017 - 07:51
I use USASpending.gov.  A little unwieldy but comprehensive and updated regularly - most agencies within 30 days;  DOD within 90 days.  It contains all federal contracts and major subcontracts and you can filter for research contracts.  For me it is a good supplement to NIH, NSF, and SBIR; and captures research spending by other agencies.Scott [Read more]  
Replied by David Wojick on 04/25/2017 - 09:33
Thanks Scott, How/where do you filter for research contracts? I do not see it. David At 11:51 AM 4/24/2017, you wrote: I useUSASpending.gov.  A little unwieldy but comprehensive and updated regularly - most agencies within 30 days;  DOD within 90 days.  It contains all federal contracts and major subcontracts and you can filter for research contracts.  For me it is a good supplement to NIH, NSF, and SBIR; and captures research spending by other agencies. Scott On Tue, Apr... [Read more]  
Replied by Caroline Wagner on 04/25/2017 - 13:56
Just to be clear – these are NOT NEW sources of data. These data have been around for years, and have been Congressionally mandated to be shared since at least the 1990s. Caroline Wagner     [Read more]  
Replied by Jeffrey Alexander on 04/25/2017 - 10:29
I'll add that the USASpending.gov data on contracts is drawn from the Federal Procurement Data System, which is notoriously error-prone (although it has improved in recent years). In particular, the classifications of contracts are often faulty, especially in that contracts that are not research-related get classified as research contracts due to insufficient attention during data entry.If you're not looking at these datasets at a granular level, but more for general trends, they are quite sufficient.-jeff [Read more]  
Replied by Gary Anderson on 04/26/2017 - 15:07
I wanted to second Jeff’s note of caution regarding FPDS data. A while back we had a contractor take a look at FY11 FPDS data and we are currently taking a deep dive into FY14, FY15 and FY16 data. Contracting officers enter detailed data on each contract action into the FPDS system. For the four years that we have looked at there are approximately 350,000 contract actions in the FPDS data. For each action, contract officers choose a product or service code which specifies the stage and area of research and development obligation, a description of contract requirement,... [Read more]  
Replied by C. Scott Dempwolf on 04/26/2017 - 11:49
All good points Gary and Jeff.  Glad NSF is looking at this from a data quality perspective.  I use the data to augment network and 'event-sequence' models of innovation ecosystems, and I add it after the core networks have been constructed from patent, NIH, NSF, SBIR and other data sources.  The models are resilient to modest levels of potential mis-codings you described.On Wed, Apr 26, 2017 at 3:07 PM, Anderson, Gary W <ganderso@nsf.gov> wrote: I wanted to second Jeff’s note of caution regarding FPDS data. A while... [Read more]  

Posted by Holly Falk-Krzesinski on 04/17/2017 - 09:32
Colleagues:   I’m trying to understand the breadth of external reporting universities do and am cataloging the various external reporting instruments/surveys universities complete (mandatory or optional) wrt to student or faculty activity and/or research activity.  Can you recommend any others I should add to the list below (I’ll share the compiled list back with the listserv)?   Thank you, Holly   ·      CGS/GRE Graduate Enrollment & Degrees Survey ·       NSF Survey of Graduate Students... [Read more]  
Replied by Susan Fitzpatrick on 04/17/2017 - 08:16
Holly – this is amazing – am I right in guessing that many of these reports require the same or in some cases overlapping bits of information?   Is collection and reporting standardized? S Susan M. Fitzpatrick, Ph.D.President, James S. McDonnell Foundation Visit JSMF forum on academic issues: www.jsmf.org/clothing-the-emperor SMF blog  www.scientificphilanthropy.com       [Read more]  
Replied by Holly Falk-Krzesinski on 04/17/2017 - 13:23
To answer your questions, Susan:   many of these reports require the same or in some cases overlapping bits of information Probably…   Is collection and reporting standardized Not likely…       Also, I should clarify my request: my focus is on US universities.  However, I certainly welcome info and insight about reporting in other countries as well.   Regards, Holly     --   From: Susan Fitzpatrick [mailto:susan@jsmf.org] Sent:... [Read more]  
Replied by David Wojick on 04/17/2017 - 09:52
All federal information collections (including NSF and ED) have to be cleared through the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) in OMB. (I helped set OIRA up 2.3 eons ago). This includes a burden estimate. If there is duplication or undue burden then one might complain to OIRA. See https://www.reginfo.gov/public/jsp/Utilities/faq.jsp#icr_info I will be happy to advise, as best I can. David David Wojick, Ph.D.... [Read more]  
Replied by Susan Fitzpatrick on 04/17/2017 - 09:14
My questions were more of the general curiosity and not just about burden (although that is an issue I am sure) – I was just concerned that so often there seems to be lots of different forms of data collected to fulfill specific purposes that could serve more general purposes.   And – because data is collected for specific purposes and in specific ways across a number of different aggregators we often get knowledge resembling swiss cheese rather than whole cloth (if I can miX my metaphors…).    Thanks, S  Susan M. Fitzpatrick, Ph.D.President, James S. McDonnell Foundation Visit JSMF... [Read more]  
Replied by David Wojick on 04/17/2017 - 10:51
What sort of general purposes do you have in mind? The specific federal agency collections are dictated by agency mission and need. These general purposes may not be a government function. On the other hand interagency cooperation might be feasible, or a legislative mandate. But burden plays in here because burden (labor hours to compile and provide the information) is the cost in the cost-benefit analysis of the proposed collection. Every agency has a burden budget which constrains their information collection activities. The collective... [Read more]  

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